Book Reviews, Literature

The Weight of Ink – Rachel Kadish

The Weight of InkFeaturing rich history, beautiful prose, magnetic characters, gender politics, and healthy doses of heresy and mystery, Rachel Kadish’s latest novel The Weight of Ink has it all. Even at 550 pages long the book can barely contain all that Kadish has packed into it, and yet the result is a mesmerizing work of fiction. Personally, it was love at first sight of the cover.

Every aspect of Kadish’s book is artistically nuanced. She maintains an impressive linguistic and cultural authenticity as her narrative moves from England in the 1660s, to the early years of the State of Israel, and 21st century British academia. The most remarkable example of this is the letters that her characters write to one another in the 1660s, and the contrast with the academic papers and emails they write in the 2000s. Kadish nimbly maneuvers between writing styles, adding depth to her storytelling, making the book a pleasure to read.

Although the book is long and complex, it is never boring. To Kadish’s great credit, she portrays each of the characters and settings clearly enough that they remain distinct and easy to follow. The real challenge of this book is following the theological and philosophical arguments that flow across borders and centuries. A minimal background in the history of the English, Dutch, and Spanish and Portuguese Jewish communities is tremendously helpful. A minimal background in the theology of Baruch Spinoza, Shabbetai Tzvi’s messianic movement, and academic libraries also makes it easier for the reader. Kadish explains these elements with clarity and concision, and the precision of her historical research is worth celebrating all on its own. The amount of detail in this book makes it necessary to read it very slowly, have the luxury of reading it in several very long stretches, or simply the willingness to read it more than once. I’m happy to be in the last category, although the next time I’m on a long flight this is the book I’m bringing.

On a final note, The Weight of Ink provided the most dynamic conversation of any of my book club’s selections in at least 5 years.  There is so much to talk about in this book, readers would be well advised to make sure they have someone with whom to have these conversations. Rachel Kadish’s The Weight of Ink is simply a book you will want to read and share with everyone you know.

 

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