Sculpture, Tishrei/Cheshvan - "Bein Ha'Or U'vein HaChoshech"

Creating Community With Light and Darkness

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Creation Mosaic, created by Wiebke, Stuart, Ana, Ephraim, Yonah Light, 2013

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Tzedakah Box, Wiebke Light, 2017

When I first found Wiebke Light’s work, I immediately fell in love with the colors of the Creation mosaic. Their vibrancy stirred up strong feelings of hope and unlimited possibilities. Reading about how her family had worked on the piece together, I was impressed by the commitment to the project and creative energy they had all brought to this work. Surely we create our brightest futures when we work together!

Her tzedakah boxes were similarly striking for the contrast of the black on white. In showcasing these images, the contrast allows us to see the details in both. Dark and light are necessary for the full creation, and makes the impact of the work that much stronger. They demand attention, calling for recognition and action. The starkness brings us out of our selves and makes us aware of our obligations to the community.

Light says the connection to community is important to both the Creation Mosaic and the tzedakah boxes. She writes that “both creations of art enhance our personal engagement with society – one by collecting charity for the poor and needy, the other by strengthening our ties with our own family”. We need our homes and families to give us space and partners to create. We need to have beautiful ritual objects inside our home to connect us to the world outside our homes. It is ultimately a question of connection. We see in these two different uses of color, the incredible power of the creative arts to foster our relationships with the people we love, and to remind us that we have the responsibility to work together to create a better future for us all.

BooksandBlintzes is grateful to Wiebke Light for sharing these images of her work. Please respect her legal and creative rights and do not distribute, copy, or share them without her permission. For more information about Light’s work, please see –

Dragon Bowl Ceramics https://www.etsy.com/shop/DragonBowlCeramics

https://bisamim.wordpress.com/

and  https://www.facebook.com/dragonbowlceramics/

About the Artist – Wiebke Light

(In her words)
Wiebke is trained as an art historian with a special focus on Medieval art and
Jewish Material Culture. She has come to creating Jewish objects after
graduation from JTS in New York with a Masters degree in Jewish Art and
Material Culture. She remains greatly inspired by the work of historical
Jewish artists and aspires to create Jewish objects that beautify our daily life
and Jewish ritual.
Since 2001, Wiebke has been working as an artist in different media. She
began her artistic exploration with linoleum printing, followed by sewing
and now ceramics. She took her first ceramic class in Seattle in 2011 with
the intention of teaching handbuilding techniques to Jewish Day school
students in the Pacific Northwest. After her move to Irvine three years ago,
she devoted more of her time to delving deeper into the medium. Since
2013, Wiebke has continuously taken ceramics classes at the Irvine Fine
Arts Center and the Orange Coast Community College. She strives to blend
her knowledge and deep commitment to her Jewish identity with the newly
learned artistic skills to create Judaica that is both unique, whimsical and useful.

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Jewish Text Art Challenge Galleries, Tishrei/Cheshvan - "Bein Ha'Or U'vein HaChoshech"

Daniel Nebenzahl – Kabbalat Shabbat

Illustrated-Kabbalat-Shabbat-Siddur-Page_53

Daniel Nebenzahl contributed these drawing to “An Illustrated Kabbalat Shabbat Siddur”, with the understanding that art can inspire and lead to a more meaningful prayer experience. This illustration, which appears at the end of the Kabbalat Shabbat service in the prayer book, led me to think about the separation of light and darkness and how it relates to the separation of time. Here we see a couple transitioning from the work week to Shabbat, from day to night, with light and darkness before them. How will they walk through these transformations together? Will they focus on the sky’s darkness or its colors? How does the light behind them affect how they will interact during this time?

To see all of Nebenzahl’s illustrations for this siddur, please see http://opensiddur.org/art/an-illustrated-kabbalat-shabbat-siddur-with-drawings-by-daniel-nebenzahl

Books and Blintzes is sharing this image in accordance with the regulations of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike copyright license.

Jewish Text Art Challenge Galleries, Tishrei/Cheshvan - "Bein Ha'Or U'vein HaChoshech"

Partnership of Darkness and Light

Micah 7-8

Are light and darkness in competition with each other or are they partners in creation? Looking at the quotes in the Jewish Text Art Challenge Gallery, it seems as though the God’s separation of light and darkness created an unintentional judgment and prejudice: light is better than darkness. The quote from the prophetic Book of Micah reminded me that God’s separation did not mean that these two elements were in competition. Rather, light and darkness were intended to work together, to be in a balance. This quote reminds me that this balance can only be achieved when we our creativity allows space, and is a partnership for both. Do you agree?

Tishrei/Cheshvan - "Bein Ha'Or U'vein HaChoshech"

Dividing Light and Darkness

God Divided the Light From the Darkness With the high holidays behind us, Books and Blintzes is looking forward to the new Jewish year, full of creative inspiration and meaningful connections.

The Jewish Text Art Challenge, our monthly showcase for Jewish art related to a particular verse from our tradition, is a centerpiece of our mission. We’re here to share Jewish art from around the world, to build a community to discover and celebrate these works, and to develop new and stronger links with our heritage.

We selected Genesis 1:4 (ברשית א:ד) as the verse to start off this year, as a way of highlighting our commitment to the creative process. Division, separation, categorization, making choices… these are all things that we do every day. But we hope that they push us forward, whether it is to complete a task, allow us to spend our resources (especially our time!) more judiciously, or see our vision come to life in our art.

As the month goes by, Books and Blintzes hopes that you will join the conversation about this verse. Show us your work. Tell us what these words mean to you. Reach out to artists whose work speaks to you. We can’t wait to see what this month will bring!

To contribute to this month’s Jewish Text Art gallery, please complete the contact form on the main Jewish Text Art Challenge page at https://booksandblintzes.com/home/jtac/