Jewish Text Art Challenge Galleries, Kislev "Nes Gadol Haya Sham", Music

To Celebrate A Miracle

Samuel Adler’s musical arrangement To Celebrate A Miracle brings to life the awe and inspiration of the Chanukah story. Incorporating 9 of the holiday’s instantly recognizable melodies, Adler’s composition encourages listeners to connect with the joy of the holiday and to embrace the hope of future redemption.

To listen to a recording and for more information about this work, please visit http://www.milkenarchive.org/music/volumes/view/cycle-of-life-in-synagogue-and-home/work/to-celebrate-a-miracle/

For more information about Samuel Adler, please visit http://www.milkenarchive.org/artists/view/samuel-adler/

 

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Film, Painting & Drawing

“Art As Activism” – Ben Shahn

Remembering Ben Shahn, born September 12, 1898. His works of social realism and his unabashed expression of his art’s powerful voice have left us with some of the most riveting images of America in the 20th century.

Watch Lauren White’s video to see the impact of Shahn’s work. White created this video as a 2009 National History Day Senior Documentary Finalist at Maryland Humanities.

Film

Jack Rosenthal

Remembering Jack Rosenthal on his birthday.

September 8, 1931 – May 29, 2004.

Jack Rosenthal was a Jewish British playwright and author, responsible for some of the most memorable depictions of Jewish life on television and in the movies. His screenplay credits include the BBC’s 1976 production Bar Mitzvah Boy and co-writing the 1983 film Yentl with Barbra Streisand.

Music

Hermann Leopoldi – Buchenwaldlied

Inside page of the January 1946, no. 1 issue of the Yiddish DP newspaper, ‘Buchenwald: Bulletin of the Buchenwald Youth in France.’ The column on the left is entitled, ‘Our Lives’. At the bottom is a poem called ‘The Song of Buchenwald’ (translated into Yiddish), sung by all the Buchenwald internees. [Photograph #44247]
Source: http://holocaustmusic.ort.org/places/camps/central-europe/buchenwald/
Herman Leopoldi, composer of the Buchenwald song (“Buchenwaldlied”), August 15, 1888 – June 28, 1959. The camp commandant organized a song competition soon after the camp opened. Leopoldi and his partner Fritz Lohner-Beda wrote the winning entry, although a non-Jewish kapo submitted it to the contest. The camp guards would command prisoners to sing the Buchenwaldlied as a way to cover up the sounds of torture and other acts of cruelty and murder. Some prisoners found meaning in this song as a symbol of resistance. Singing of freedom and the future gave them the opportunity to express their hopes for the demise of their captors.

To listen to a recording of the song, please click here.

Music

Music of Salomon Sulzer

Born March 30, 1804, Salomon Sulzer was one of the most important voices shaping the Chazzanut (the cantorate), Jewish music, and synagogue liturgy of the Western European and German communities.

See here for a video recording of the Ensemble Choral Copernic sing his Adon Olam in concert at the Rykestrassse Synagogue in Berlin, Dec. 23, 2012, as well as for a link to the score and the full text of Sulzer’s seminal work Shir Zion.