Sculpture, Tishrei/Cheshvan - "Bein Ha'Or U'vein HaChoshech"

Creating Community With Light and Darkness

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Creation Mosaic, created by Wiebke, Stuart, Ana, Ephraim, Yonah Light, 2013

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Tzedakah Box, Wiebke Light, 2017

When I first found Wiebke Light’s work, I immediately fell in love with the colors of the Creation mosaic. Their vibrancy stirred up strong feelings of hope and unlimited possibilities. Reading about how her family had worked on the piece together, I was impressed by the commitment to the project and creative energy they had all brought to this work. Surely we create our brightest futures when we work together!

Her tzedakah boxes were similarly striking for the contrast of the black on white. In showcasing these images, the contrast allows us to see the details in both. Dark and light are necessary for the full creation, and makes the impact of the work that much stronger. They demand attention, calling for recognition and action. The starkness brings us out of our selves and makes us aware of our obligations to the community.

Light says the connection to community is important to both the Creation Mosaic and the tzedakah boxes. She writes that “both creations of art enhance our personal engagement with society – one by collecting charity for the poor and needy, the other by strengthening our ties with our own family”. We need our homes and families to give us space and partners to create. We need to have beautiful ritual objects inside our home to connect us to the world outside our homes. It is ultimately a question of connection. We see in these two different uses of color, the incredible power of the creative arts to foster our relationships with the people we love, and to remind us that we have the responsibility to work together to create a better future for us all.

BooksandBlintzes is grateful to Wiebke Light for sharing these images of her work. Please respect her legal and creative rights and do not distribute, copy, or share them without her permission. For more information about Light’s work, please see –

Dragon Bowl Ceramics https://www.etsy.com/shop/DragonBowlCeramics

https://bisamim.wordpress.com/

and  https://www.facebook.com/dragonbowlceramics/

About the Artist – Wiebke Light

(In her words)
Wiebke is trained as an art historian with a special focus on Medieval art and
Jewish Material Culture. She has come to creating Jewish objects after
graduation from JTS in New York with a Masters degree in Jewish Art and
Material Culture. She remains greatly inspired by the work of historical
Jewish artists and aspires to create Jewish objects that beautify our daily life
and Jewish ritual.
Since 2001, Wiebke has been working as an artist in different media. She
began her artistic exploration with linoleum printing, followed by sewing
and now ceramics. She took her first ceramic class in Seattle in 2011 with
the intention of teaching handbuilding techniques to Jewish Day school
students in the Pacific Northwest. After her move to Irvine three years ago,
she devoted more of her time to delving deeper into the medium. Since
2013, Wiebke has continuously taken ceramics classes at the Irvine Fine
Arts Center and the Orange Coast Community College. She strives to blend
her knowledge and deep commitment to her Jewish identity with the newly
learned artistic skills to create Judaica that is both unique, whimsical and useful.

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Av - Nachamu

Nachamu – Be Comforted My People

Inspired by the words of Isaiah 40:1, the verse begins the haftara on Shabbat Nachamu, the “Shabbat of Comfort” immediately following the 9th of Av. It is the first in a series of texts of consolation, moving from the darkest day of Jewish history as the community seeks comfort, strength, the vision to rebuild. Join BooksAndBlintzes all through the Hebrew month of Av as we share inspiration for finding solace in the arts.

If you have original work you would like to contribute, please be in touch! We would love to hear your thoughts, feelings, and feedback about the images and music that we showcase on this site.

July/Tammuz "Ma Tovu Ohalecha Ya'acov" How Goodly Are Your Tents O Jacob

The Blessing of Community

Artist Susie Lubell’s colorful im3 Lubellage of the Ma Tovu text highlights the vibrancy of the Israelite community. The words of the blessing embrace the diverse buildings and trees, uniting them within a common vision of peace and faith. Each home and plant is different, yet they stand close together, overlapping and connecting with each other to make the whole. The image’s brightness creates an atmosphere of celebration, security, and vitality. It is a blessing for the community and all who are included in its shelter.

Susie Lubell is a self-trained artist now living in Israel. She originally created this image with watercolor paint. To see more of her fine art work, please visit her website at www.susielubell.com. You can also visit www.milkandhoneyartshop.etsy.com to view prints of her watercolor paintings.

 

 

Jewish Text Art Challenge Galleries, July/Tammuz "Ma Tovu Ohalecha Ya'acov" How Goodly Are Your Tents O Jacob

A Mezuzah to Bring the Blessing Home

Shraga Landesman is a Haifa-based artist who invites you to link your home to the ancient Israelite camp. He crafted this mezuzah case as “a moving tribute to the strength of the Jewish home”.  Hanging a mezuzah on the doorpost is a clearly visible sign of Jewish ownership, demonstrating the willingness to be recognized as part of the community. The words from the blessing Ma Tovu express the hope that this connection will support peace and tranquility in the home.

For more information about the artist and his work, please see http://www.landesman-shraga.israel.net/ Thank you for giving us permission to share your image and your words.

This is the description that accompanies the mezuzah case.

July/Tammuz "Ma Tovu Ohalecha Ya'acov" How Goodly Are Your Tents O Jacob

Ma Tovu – How Goodly Are Your Tents

The Torah portion “Balak“, which comes from the Book of Numbers and is read during the Hebrew month of Tammuz includes Balaam’s blessing of the Israelites. Although he had been hired to curse the people, his “eyes were opened” and at the moment, was moved to praise, rather than censure. The rabbis incorporated this verse into the daily morning prayer service, when at the time that people enter the synagogue, they recognize the value of coming together as a community.

מַה-טֹּבוּ אֹהָלֶיךָ, יַעֲקֹב; מִשְׁכְּנֹתֶיךָ, יִשְׂרָאֵל

“How goodly are thy tents, O Jacob, thy dwellings, O Israel”

This month’s Jewish Text Art Challenge Gallery will feature media that represent artistic understandings of this blessing. Join the conversation by sharing which ones speak to you, and your own creations that praise the values of community and klal Yisrael.