Jewish Text Art Challenge Galleries, Tishrei/Cheshvan - "Bein Ha'Or U'vein HaChoshech"

Daniel Nebenzahl – Kabbalat Shabbat

Illustrated-Kabbalat-Shabbat-Siddur-Page_53

Daniel Nebenzahl contributed these drawing to “An Illustrated Kabbalat Shabbat Siddur”, with the understanding that art can inspire and lead to a more meaningful prayer experience. This illustration, which appears at the end of the Kabbalat Shabbat service in the prayer book, led me to think about the separation of light and darkness and how it relates to the separation of time. Here we see a couple transitioning from the work week to Shabbat, from day to night, with light and darkness before them. How will they walk through these transformations together? Will they focus on the sky’s darkness or its colors? How does the light behind them affect how they will interact during this time?

To see all of Nebenzahl’s illustrations for this siddur, please see http://opensiddur.org/art/an-illustrated-kabbalat-shabbat-siddur-with-drawings-by-daniel-nebenzahl

Books and Blintzes is sharing this image in accordance with the regulations of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike copyright license.

Tishrei/Cheshvan - "Bein Ha'Or U'vein HaChoshech"

Dividing Light and Darkness

God Divided the Light From the Darkness With the high holidays behind us, Books and Blintzes is looking forward to the new Jewish year, full of creative inspiration and meaningful connections.

The Jewish Text Art Challenge, our monthly showcase for Jewish art related to a particular verse from our tradition, is a centerpiece of our mission. We’re here to share Jewish art from around the world, to build a community to discover and celebrate these works, and to develop new and stronger links with our heritage.

We selected Genesis 1:4 (ברשית א:ד) as the verse to start off this year, as a way of highlighting our commitment to the creative process. Division, separation, categorization, making choices… these are all things that we do every day. But we hope that they push us forward, whether it is to complete a task, allow us to spend our resources (especially our time!) more judiciously, or see our vision come to life in our art.

As the month goes by, Books and Blintzes hopes that you will join the conversation about this verse. Show us your work. Tell us what these words mean to you. Reach out to artists whose work speaks to you. We can’t wait to see what this month will bring!

To contribute to this month’s Jewish Text Art gallery, please complete the contact form on the main Jewish Text Art Challenge page at https://booksandblintzes.com/home/jtac/

Elul - Avinu Malkeinu

Avinu Malkeinu – Blessed – Rae Shagalov

The marriage of text and art to inspire spiritual growth is the foundation of artist Rae Shagalov’s work. In her piece “Avinu Malkeinu” and its accompanying text, the power of prayer and its ability to bring blessings are paramount. To see and read more about Rae Shagalov’s art, please see www.joyfullyjewish.com and www.holysparks.com.

 

Film, Painting & Drawing

“Art As Activism” – Ben Shahn

Remembering Ben Shahn, born September 12, 1898. His works of social realism and his unabashed expression of his art’s powerful voice have left us with some of the most riveting images of America in the 20th century.

Watch Lauren White’s video to see the impact of Shahn’s work. White created this video as a 2009 National History Day Senior Documentary Finalist at Maryland Humanities.

Painting & Drawing

Israel Abramofsky – The Art of Jewish Eastern Europe

Israel Abramofsky, was a Russian-American Jewish artist, who is particularly well remembered for his images of Jewish life in Eastern Europe. Born in Kiev on September 10, 1888, he eventually made his home in Ohio. The Cleveland Artists’ Exhibition in May 1919 included his entry “Drawing of Russian Jew After A Massacre”.

Discussing his life and work, Abramofsky said “I am unable to classify myself, except I hope that I am a part of the twentieth century. I do feel that my Jewish types reflect the tradition and beliefs that . . . have kept them separate as a people since Abraham”.

 

Av - Nachamu

Nachamu – The Power of The Words

Israeli-artist Michael Sgan-Cohen created this acrylic and oil pen work in 1978. The street sign and emphasis on the words highlight the prophetic nature of the verse. It is a direction and call to action underlining the power of words to bring comfort.

By Michael Sgan-Cohen (מיכאל סגן-כהן) (Ktavim) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Av - Nachamu

Nachamu – Be Comforted My People

Inspired by the words of Isaiah 40:1, the verse begins the haftara on Shabbat Nachamu, the “Shabbat of Comfort” immediately following the 9th of Av. It is the first in a series of texts of consolation, moving from the darkest day of Jewish history as the community seeks comfort, strength, the vision to rebuild. Join BooksAndBlintzes all through the Hebrew month of Av as we share inspiration for finding solace in the arts.

If you have original work you would like to contribute, please be in touch! We would love to hear your thoughts, feelings, and feedback about the images and music that we showcase on this site.