Elul - Avinu Malkeinu

The Shape of Avinu Malkeinu – Marlene Burns

marleneburns©2017. All rights reserved

I discovered this beautiful painting by Arizona-based artist Marlene Burns and was immediately drawn in by the vibrant colors and sense of fluidity. When I saw that its title was “Avninu Malkeinu‘, I knew there was even more to the story.  Thank you to Marlene Burns for sharing, in your own words, the inspiration and special meaning for this painting.

We appreciate the artist giving us permission to share her work on booksandblintzes. Please respect her creative and legal rights – do not share, copy, or alter this image in any way. For more information about Ms. Burns and her art, please see www.art-MarleneBurns.com

 

Av - Nachamu

Needlepoint Comfort – Chaim Parchi

We were mesmerized by the colors and fluidity in Chaim Parchi’s needlepoint design. With the words of “Nachamu – comfort” surrounding images of Jerusalem, Parchi’s design embraced us. We couldn’t help but wonder how the completed needlepoint would feel under our fingertips, magnifying how our sense of touch is connected with the idea of comfort and safety.

Thank you to the artist, Chaim Parchi, for his permission to use this image, and to Doreen Finkel at www.artneedlepoint.com for connecting us. More information and his other work can be found at http://www.artneedlepoint.com/artists/parchi-chaim.

Av - Nachamu

Nachamu – The Power of The Words

Israeli-artist Michael Sgan-Cohen created this acrylic and oil pen work in 1978. The street sign and emphasis on the words highlight the prophetic nature of the verse. It is a direction and call to action underlining the power of words to bring comfort.

By Michael Sgan-Cohen (מיכאל סגן-כהן) (Ktavim) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Av - Nachamu

Nachamu – Be Comforted My People

Inspired by the words of Isaiah 40:1, the verse begins the haftara on Shabbat Nachamu, the “Shabbat of Comfort” immediately following the 9th of Av. It is the first in a series of texts of consolation, moving from the darkest day of Jewish history as the community seeks comfort, strength, the vision to rebuild. Join BooksAndBlintzes all through the Hebrew month of Av as we share inspiration for finding solace in the arts.

If you have original work you would like to contribute, please be in touch! We would love to hear your thoughts, feelings, and feedback about the images and music that we showcase on this site.

July/Tammuz "Ma Tovu Ohalecha Ya'acov" How Goodly Are Your Tents O Jacob

Balaam’s Perspective – A Blessing From Above

Darius Gilmont’s painting “Parshat Balak” is all about perspective. We get to share Balaam’s view of the Israelite camp, and wonder if such a sight would also lead us to pronounce the words of “Ma Tovu“. Are the people aware that Balaam stands above them? Can they hear his blessing? With bright colors and simple shapes, Gilmont focuses on Balaam and provides a sense of order and intention to the text.

Darius Gilmont is a painter based in Ra’anana, Israel who connects his work to the “naive art” and “symbolist art” genres. To see more of his paintings, including others that depict Torah texts, please visit his website at www.darius-art.com.

Books and Blintzes thanks the artist for his permission to use this image. Please do not share, copy, distribute, etc. without his consent.

 

July/Tammuz "Ma Tovu Ohalecha Ya'acov" How Goodly Are Your Tents O Jacob

The Blessing of Community

Artist Susie Lubell’s colorful im3 Lubellage of the Ma Tovu text highlights the vibrancy of the Israelite community. The words of the blessing embrace the diverse buildings and trees, uniting them within a common vision of peace and faith. Each home and plant is different, yet they stand close together, overlapping and connecting with each other to make the whole. The image’s brightness creates an atmosphere of celebration, security, and vitality. It is a blessing for the community and all who are included in its shelter.

Susie Lubell is a self-trained artist now living in Israel. She originally created this image with watercolor paint. To see more of her fine art work, please visit her website at www.susielubell.com. You can also visit www.milkandhoneyartshop.etsy.com to view prints of her watercolor paintings.

 

 

Jewish Text Art Challenge Galleries, July/Tammuz "Ma Tovu Ohalecha Ya'acov" How Goodly Are Your Tents O Jacob

D’rash Design – Inspired Commentary

Artist Christina Mattison Ebert began the “D’rash Design Project” in 2012, creating pieces that expressed her interpretation of Jewish texts. Drawing on the weekly Torah portion, haftara (selection from the Prophets) and holidays, she ultimately crafted over 60 works of art. This is one of her images for the portion Balak.

From the artist:

“How fair are your tents, oh Jacob, your dwelling places, oh people Israel!” is one of my favorite verses in the Torah. Spoken by a non-Jewish prophet (Bilam) upon seeing the Israelite encampments in the wilderness, this line is unique because Bilam had originally come to curse the Israelites so that the Moabites could defeat them in war. Bilam recites a full poem in praise of the Israelite encampment, which you can read in Numbers 24:5-9.

Thank you to Christina Mattison Ebert for her permission to share this image and description. You can learn more about her work as an artist and illustrator at http://www.cmattison.com/. More about the D’rash Design project including other images, is available at https://www.etsy.com/shop/drashdesigns.